Tag Archives: time management

Resetting Goals—An Introspective Approach Yields Best Results


to-do-list-749304_640This year is almost 25% complete. When I came to that realization a few days ago, I panicked—I haven’t accomplished nearly a quarter of my plan for 2018.

I started off strong in January, completing two major projects that were due in February. But then a series of family health issues knocked me off track. I’ve managed to stay on top of daily responsibilities, and even to make progress on one major project that has an April deadline. However, I am far behind pace on another major project I had hoped to complete by June, and I don’t think I’m going to be able to make up the lost time.

I will have to reset some of my goals for the year.

Periodically, I find it is good to conduct a thorough self-assessment. My purpose when I do so isn’t usually to reassess annual goals, which is my current immediate need. I usually am trying to examine my life on a longer-term basis. This week, however, I decided that before I restructured my 2018 goals, I should look at the big picture of my life. I was intrigued when I saw the article “50 Tough Questions You Never Ask Yourself, But Should,” on Inc.com, by Marla Tabaka, and thought it would be a good vehicle for self-assessment.

Ms. Tabaka makes the point that personal growth begins with introspection. She says,

“If you want results, begin with what’s on the inside instead of pushing to control what’s on the outside.”

And then she lists fifty excellent questions for consideration.

The question I am focused on at the moment is #10:

“What are three things I want to pay closer attention to in 2018?”

This question addresses the need I have at the moment.

My answer:

  • My own health
  • The health of other family members
  • My current primary project (the one that’s behind schedule)

I was glad to note that the health issues that had preoccupied me for the last two months were, in fact, high priorities for the year. I was also unhappy to see that I was letting my other top priority slide.

In an effort to regain momentum on that primary project for the year, I might have to let other projects slip, including some of my regular obligations. I don’t like that reality, but there it is. Once I acknowledge that reality, I can make the necessary changes in how I spend my time to achieve the best results I can this year. And I can consciously decide which goals for 2018 will have to fall by the wayside, rather than letting the results happen without any thought on my part.

I notice that this blog is not one of my top three priorities for the year. I hope it will remain high enough on my list to continue my twice-a-month posting schedule. But if I put it on hiatus again (as I did last summer), I will tell readers honestly—it is slipping lower on my priority list.

What priorities do you need to change in your life? Which of the fifty questions in the article strike closest to home for you?

 

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Five-Minute Meetings—I Wish!


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Last week I read an article by Sue Shellenbarger in The Wall Street Journal entitled “Can You Keep Your Meeting to Five Minutes?”

All I could say to myself was, “I wish!” My corporate life involved days full of hour-long meetings. Almost every meeting, it seemed, was scheduled for an hour.

In a matrix organization, this means a lot of meetings, just to keep up with one’s bosses, staff, and peers. A direct supervisor. A dotted-line supervisor. Six peers in the line organization I supported, as well as six Human Resources peers. Six direct reports. (Those last three categories varied, but six is about average.) That’s 20 hour-long meetings a month.

Then there were the group staff meetings, which were usually two hours long—one for the line organization, one for the HR organization, my own group staff. That’s three more monthly meetings.

There were also periodic all-day meetings with one group or another. Each of those meetings had agenda items that were one hour long—six or seven meetings packed into a single day.

And none of the meetings were real work. Most of them were just to keep tabs on what’s going on. So add in the project team meetings, the crisis meetings (when an employee needed serious discipline or firing, or an employee complained to HR), and the meetings with outside consultants.

Sometimes decisions were made, but often the meetings were status reports. I can read a status report. I can ask questions in a phone call or email or text message.

It wasn’t that the meetings were completely wasted time. They did insure that people were on the same page. They did build relationships among people whose jobs often took them in different directions working with different parts of the organization.

But for every meeting to default to an hour? Probably too long.

I typically had five or six hours of meetings booked on my calendar before I walked in the door each morning. I instructed my administrative assistant to keep two hours free on my calendar every day. She could move the time around to fit in meetings, but I wanted the two hours to get some actual work done. Some days she couldn’t do it.

I got more done in half a day on the weekend than I did in a full day during the week. Because on Saturday and Sunday there were no meetings.

So a five-minute meeting? Even if there were three times as many meetings, I would have come out ahead. Or a default of 30 minutes for a meeting would have improved my time management ability.

I remember one presentation I was scheduled to give to the company’s executive committee. My hour-long slot got pushed back until I only had fifteen minutes. My topic was admittedly a longer-term priority than some of the day’s other agenda items, so I understood why I was the presentation that got squished.

I had a sixteen-slide deck to present. I could hear the sigh of relief when I asked the executives to turn to Slide 13. The earlier slides were data, which I wanted to be sure they saw. But what was important for the time I had left was the decision they needed to make. That discussion started on Slide 13. We reached a decision in the 15 minutes of time that remained. We didn’t have as rich a discussion as I had wanted. But we moved my project forward.

I know I’m whining in this post, about too much time in meetings, about the wrong types of topics discussed in meetings, about having my own meeting time cut. But the bottom line is true—organizations spend too much time meeting and not enough time doing.

For more on holding more productive meetings, see “How to Improve the ROI of Your Staff Meetings,” by Dianna Booher, posted November 9, 2017, on TLNT.com. As Ms. Booher points out, meetings cost time—do you know how much your meetings cost your organization?

What meetings do you attend that could be shortened, delegated, or eliminated?

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Managing Myself: Productivity v. Learning


Design Mascot Computer SalesI’ve always been an advocate of measuring productivity. When I worked in the corporate world, I ordered my days to meet the objectives my boss set for me. I influenced the setting of my objectives, but once we had agreement, I worked toward achieving them.

Now that I am self-employed, I still keep track of my activities each week and set goals for the year and for the week ahead. I break large projects up into phases and manageable pieces. I try to balance work on immediate tasks and the next steps in long-term projects.

I chafe when other people interfere with my plans to work productively. It’s easy to let family and friends and co-workers order my days for me. Their goals are not my goals, and when our goals conflict (as they inevitably will), one or both of us must compromise. If I don’t keep a laser eye on my own plans, if I don’t build in flexibility to address the necessary give-and-take of life, then I will not accomplish what I want. So I try to be flexible, yet focused.

Given my desire for productivity, I was intrigued to see an article in Inc.com a couple weeks ago by Michael Simmons of Empact titled “Average People Are Productive, Successful People Are Learners.” Because, of course, I consider myself successful, not average.

According to the article, learning is the ultimate productivity.

“The paradigm we should all consider for productivity is learning. As opposed to productivity hacks—as I said, there’s only so much in your day you can optimize—learning is an exponential process with no cap. What do I mean by this? The results of learning are twofold: better decisions and breakthrough ideas. This can give results that are 1,000x better, not just 2x better.”

What does it take to be a learner? Mr. Simmons’s article stresses the importance of reading. He suggests spending seven hours a week (one hour a day) reading—which translates, he says, to about a book every week.

That’s a good goal. I can measure that. I can build it into my personal objectives.

I do read. Mostly, I read for enjoyment, but I also read a lot of professional books and periodicals and online newsletters on human resources, dispute resolution, legal topics, business strategy, and the craft of writing. I probably spend close to an hour a day on these professional development activities every day, though I haven’t measured it daily.

Based on Mr. Simmons’s recommendation, I will try to be more mindful of how I read to learn. I will think about what I want to learn and focus more of my reading on these topics.

And I will seek out and measure other opportunities to learn—people with whom I can discuss topics I want to know more about, places I can go to see and hear and touch new experiences. In short, I will invest in myself and plan that investment into my productivity goals.

What do you do to be a learner?

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Time Management is YOUR Problem


Its about Time Series III’ve written before about discretionary time—the concept of having time that you control and using it for your own priorities.

That concept has hit home for me again recently. I have a new project that I am trying to squeeze in on top of all my other projects. This new endeavor takes five to ten hours a week for about eight weeks. That’s a lot of time to find. What can give? I’m cutting some activities, streamlining others, hoping a few matters have deadlines with some flexibility.

This week I also read an article on LinkedIn by Shane Atchison entitled, “Schedule for the Unexpected,” Oct. 21, 2015. Mr. Atchison recommends scheduling one hour of flex time for yourself every day. That’s time you deliberately leave free to deal with the daily crises that always seem to arise. I’ve had a few of those recently, while trying to cram in my new project.

When I worked in corporate roles, I used to ask my administrative assistants to save me two hours of “work time” every day. They could move the time around without consulting me to accommodate meetings I needed to attend. But they couldn’t cut into those two hours of unscheduled time without asking me first, unless it was my boss or the CEO who wanted my time.

This system worked pretty well. There were obviously times that I had to give up my work time, but most days if I had two hours in my office, I could keep up with phone calls, email, make dents in major projects, and still leave the office by 6:00pm feeling like the next day was manageable.

So I’m thinking now that, once I get over the hump of this current project, I need to do a better job of scheduling flexible hours each day for myself. Now that I work for myself, it is harder to make time for long-term priorities when there are so many short-term issues that arise each day. The problem is the same as when I worked in a corporate role—but I no longer have an assistant to guard my time.

I have to guard my time myself. If I don’t manage it, no one else will.

What tricks do you use to manage your time?

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