Tag Archives: self-assessment

Managing Personal Crises and Work


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I had another topic planned for today’s post, but then life got in the way. A relative had a health crisis I had to deal with. This crisis made me decide to write about the ongoing struggle for balance between work and other aspects of life, a struggle that never ends, no matter what stage of our career we’re in.

This past week was certainly not the first time that personal issues have interfered with my professional plans. I raised two children while working full-time in a demanding professional job. When one of our children was ill, my husband and I often argued about who needed to to to work more and whose work responsibilities could be put on hold for a day . . . or two. Most of the time we were able to split the burden fairly equally, but it didn’t always work out that way.

Both my husband and I were fortunate because we had some control over our calendars . . . most days. But we each had some courtroom appointments and other meetings that could not be rescheduled.

We were also fortunate that, while we might get raised eyebrows from coworkers when we couldn’t be at work for family reasons, we were respected enough and we had others in our workplaces dealing with similar issues. Therefore, our careers were not seriously at risk. I think we both might have earned more over the years if we had not been viewed as professionals who did sometimes have to juggle family responsibilities, but we weren’t going to get fired over an absence or two.

For the past ten years I have been self-employed, working as a mediator and Human Resources consultant. Now I have even more control over my calendar, but I am also more dependent on the number of hours I work for income.

bulletin-board-3233653_640I was fortunate this week. I could instantly juggle my schedule to deal with the current health emergency. It meant I skipped one meeting and wrote this blog post off the top of my head instead of a post requiring some research. Some weeks I have obligations I would have difficulty rescheduling, but this week I could do it. So I did. Without any hesitation.

At this point in my life, I relish flexibility more than a higher income. And I know I am fortunate to have the resources to make that choice.

I encounter many younger professionals who haven’t yet had to make serious choices between work and other responsibilities. I also know many senior professionals who look askance at the decisions I’ve made to reduce my scheduled commitments—and therefore my professional status. There are days when my diminished income and role in the business world bother me, but most of the time I am happy with the trade-offs I’ve made.

What choices have you had to make over the years? What choices have others around you made? How do you feel about both your own choices and those of your coworkers?

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Filed under Human Resources, Management, Philosophy, Work/Life

Resetting Goals—An Introspective Approach Yields Best Results


to-do-list-749304_640This year is almost 25% complete. When I came to that realization a few days ago, I panicked—I haven’t accomplished nearly a quarter of my plan for 2018.

I started off strong in January, completing two major projects that were due in February. But then a series of family health issues knocked me off track. I’ve managed to stay on top of daily responsibilities, and even to make progress on one major project that has an April deadline. However, I am far behind pace on another major project I had hoped to complete by June, and I don’t think I’m going to be able to make up the lost time.

I will have to reset some of my goals for the year.

Periodically, I find it is good to conduct a thorough self-assessment. My purpose when I do so isn’t usually to reassess annual goals, which is my current immediate need. I usually am trying to examine my life on a longer-term basis. This week, however, I decided that before I restructured my 2018 goals, I should look at the big picture of my life. I was intrigued when I saw the article “50 Tough Questions You Never Ask Yourself, But Should,” on Inc.com, by Marla Tabaka, and thought it would be a good vehicle for self-assessment.

Ms. Tabaka makes the point that personal growth begins with introspection. She says,

“If you want results, begin with what’s on the inside instead of pushing to control what’s on the outside.”

And then she lists fifty excellent questions for consideration.

The question I am focused on at the moment is #10:

“What are three things I want to pay closer attention to in 2018?”

This question addresses the need I have at the moment.

My answer:

  • My own health
  • The health of other family members
  • My current primary project (the one that’s behind schedule)

I was glad to note that the health issues that had preoccupied me for the last two months were, in fact, high priorities for the year. I was also unhappy to see that I was letting my other top priority slide.

In an effort to regain momentum on that primary project for the year, I might have to let other projects slip, including some of my regular obligations. I don’t like that reality, but there it is. Once I acknowledge that reality, I can make the necessary changes in how I spend my time to achieve the best results I can this year. And I can consciously decide which goals for 2018 will have to fall by the wayside, rather than letting the results happen without any thought on my part.

I notice that this blog is not one of my top three priorities for the year. I hope it will remain high enough on my list to continue my twice-a-month posting schedule. But if I put it on hiatus again (as I did last summer), I will tell readers honestly—it is slipping lower on my priority list.

What priorities do you need to change in your life? Which of the fifty questions in the article strike closest to home for you?

 

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Three Turning Points in a Career


I recently came across something that an old mentor of mine once wrote me as I approached my 30th birthday in the mid-1980s:

“There are three turning points in your career you will go through:

“1. Wondering if you really like what you do, at about age 30.

“2. Mid-life crisis, at about age 40, when you have a strong desire to do something else, and have a sense of losing your youth and vitality, wondering why you haven’t done more and why you’re not at the top.

“3. The end of your career, which might come any time after about age 60, when you’re ready for retirement, want to do more with your life than work, but may have some regret that you haven’t achieved your goals.”

His words weren’t the most artful description of career stages I’ve read, but they had an impact on me, and I’ve had occasion to think about these turning points over the years. He described pivotal times that I did in fact experience in my career.

MP900341467We all go through our individual variations on these career stages. Our chronological age may vary some from what my mentor stated (in particular, retirement in today’s world can come much earlier or much later than age 60). The depth and severity of the emotional conflict each of us feels are likely to be different from person to person, and one turning point might hit one person harder, while someone else is impacted more by another turning point. Finally, how we choose to cope with each of these turning points will be as personal as each of us and our career paths are.

My mentor wrote this to me when I was approaching my 30th birthday and at turning point #1. At that time, he had passed turning point #2, and was beginning to think about #3. Now I’ve passed #3 myself.

In my case, I gutted my way through turning point #1. I stayed in the same career with the same company for another decade after my mentor and I discussed my disillusionment with where I was at that time. But at my #2 turning point, I switched careers, moving from law to Human Resources. And my #3 came when I was only 50—I quit the corporate world to turn to consulting and writing, which I expect to continue for many years into the future.

In my mentor’s case, he moved into management from an individual contributor role at his turning point #1. He changed careers and industries at #2, though remained in a corporate setting. At #3 he also left the corporate world and moved into a teaching position at a small college in a poor, rural community, which he continued to do until he turned 70, when he retired completely.

My mentor said one other thing to me in that letter he wrote long ago,

“Very few think about these things. They just go as far as they go.”

He encouraged me to really ponder what I wanted out of life at each turning point I faced. Perhaps that’s what started me on my journey of self-assessment.

How have you coped with turning points in your own career, and what helped you work your way through them? How have you mentored others facing turning points in their careers?

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Filed under Employee Engagement, Leadership, Philosophy, Workplace

When a Major Project Is Over, How Do You Decide What Comes Next?


2A83XPT89B.jpgI have just finished a major project and I’m at loose ends. I’ve been at this point many times in my career. When I worked for a corporation, there was usually another project waiting to take the place of the one just finished. In fact, I generally had many projects overlapping, though sometimes one took precedence. But now that I work for myself, when one big project ends, I need to motivate myself to move on to the next.

For the last couple of months, I have been bringing a huge writing project to closure. It is about to be published (not under the Sara Rickover name, so I can’t tell you what it is). I have spent countless hours on the minutiae, and I am just now able to raise my head and look around me. What work do I take on next? I ask myself.

In the corporate world, when I had a moment to think about what came next, I would assess what in my job was boring me (that I wanted to do less of), and I’d think about what interested me and how I might expand my expertise (that I wanted to do more of). That’s how I moved from defending employment cases into drafting employee benefit plan documents—it felt like it was time for me to broaden the service I could provide to my Human Resource clients, and employee benefits was a way to do it.

At other points in my career, my boss asked me to move into new areas, and I had little choice. That’s how I got into handling property tax assessment disputes for one division and specialized contract work for another division. Not glamorous stuff, but these matters did teach me more about business, and I’ve used both skills in non-profit work I’ve done in recent years.

Now I am faced with several possibilities for what comes next. The advantage is that I get to choose. So, how do I choose? Here are some of the questions I am asking myself:

  • Do I do what seems like the logical next step?
  • Do I do what will teach me the most?
  • Do I do what will make me the most money?
  • Do I do what I most want to do?

And after asking myself these questions, I asked: How can I make one project address most of these needs?

I think I’ve landed on my next project. It is an outgrowth of the project I just completed, but I want to structure my approach to this issue differently. I hope with a new approach I will learn new things. It isn’t necessarily what I most want to do, but I am getting excited about it as I plan the first steps.

What do you do when you get to choose your next project?

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Filed under Management, Workplace, Writing

How Trends in Corporate Governance Vary for Smaller Firms


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Flickr photo from reynermedia on Creative Commons

I work mostly with smaller organizations, especially family-run companies, but I’m interested in corporate governance trends at larger institutions. I’ve written before about why privately held companies might want independent boards of directors. What is good for large institutions is often also helpful in small companies. And sometimes smaller organizations are ahead of stagnated large companies—they can change more rapidly when the need arises.

Here are some recent trends in corporate governance, together with how I think the trends may work differently in large and small companies:

  • Focus on independence and diversity

The Council of Institutional Investors (CII) states in its Corporate Governance Policies that at least two-thirds of a board’s members should be independent. Most small businesses rely primarily on company management to serve as directors. When most of the shareholders are also managers in the organization, this makes sense.

However, as a business grows, a focus on independence becomes more important. Large institutional shareholders will demand a voice on the board, and their opinions might or might not agree with what management wants. Because shareholders are the ultimate decision-makers, their voices should decide who is on the board.

Diversity may or may not be a focus in both large and small companies. Public sentiment desires more diversity in corporate decision-making, and greater racial, ethnic and gender diversity can keep consumer products, entertainment, and other companies with a public base more in tune with its customers. However, shareholders at some institutions may feel less strongly than others.

Here is another trend where small and large companies may diverge. Shareholders at family-run companies are more likely to want continuity and consensus than larger companies with institutional owners. Board diversity is particularly likely to be important where the shareholders are public entities, such as government worker pension plans or universities.

  • More scrutiny of the board, through self-assessment and shareholder assessment

The U.S. National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) recommends that the Governance Committee of boards should have a process to routinely assess its own performance, the performance of its Committees, and its individual directors. Moreover, a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is one of three standing committees—along with an Audit Committee and a Compensation Committee—that the NYSE requires be composed entirely of independent directors.

This self-assessment is a growing trend in corporate boards. Along with self-assessment is an increased scrutiny of the board by institutional shareholders. With only independent shareholders on the governance committees of publicly traded companies, these large shareholders have the opportunity to assess the board and make changes when necessary.

At smaller and privately held companies, self-assessment and shareholder assessment may be less rigorous. But all companies should develop some form of board member assessment. For these smaller companies, it might be an outgrowth of internal succession planning and leadership development.

  • Increased transparency and disclosure

Along with board assessment comes the need for transparency in board activities. Shareholders cannot assess what they cannot see. The NACD expects boards to disclose sufficient information to shareholders to enable them to assess whether the Board is functioning effectively.

What is sufficient information will vary from organization to organization. In larger organizations, what is material to the company’s functioning will be much greater than at smaller companies. But as the number of independent board members increases and there is less involvement of management directors (who presumably know what is going on internally), the amount of disclosure will increase.

  • Attention to a broader array of risks, such as cyber-attacks

It used to be that boards only needed to worry about the corporate balance sheet and CEO succession (and they could avoid the succession issues for years at a time). However, in today’s environment, cyber-crimes will only become more sophisticated, and every organization needs to consider its vulnerabilities, along with those of its suppliers and customers.

Now, not only must directors focus on financial threats, but other existential risks as well. These risks might come a wide variety of causes even beyond cyper-attacks—natural or environmental disasters, terrorism, and public relations debacles.

A good board of directors at any institution, large or small, thinks about these threats. Each organization will need to undertake its own risk assessments, then educate its board of directors about its conclusions.

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Flickr photo from thetaxhaven on Creative Commons

Flickr photo from thetaxhaven on Creative Commons

Institutional investors at large organizations will continue to demand greater influence not only on financial strategies, but also on risk assessment and board member assessment. As these demands grow, shareholders at smaller organizations, including family-run companies, need to analyze what makes sense in their companies.

Furthermore, managers interested in developing themselves to be board members someday—regardless of the size of institution on whose board they might serve—would be well served to educate themselves in these areas of corporate governance. To be a serious candidate for any corporate board, an individual needs to be savvy about what shareholders expect in today’s environment.

What other corporate governance trends do you see? Which trends that I mentioned do you think are most important?

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Filed under Diversity, Leadership, Management

My 200th Post: A Retrospective, a Thank-You, and a Request


post-milestone-200-2xWordPress tells me this is my 200th post. I have been posting regularly (weekly or so) since November 2011. I’ve taken a couple of short breaks, but for the most part, every Monday there has been a new post, and sometimes another later in the week.

I am proud of the blog and how it has developed over the past three and one-half years. To give myself a pat on the back, I’m linking to some of my favorite posts. Please take a few minutes to review them. I hope you enjoy the posts, whether you are reading them again, or for the first time.

Humility and Leadership: Knowing Thyself

Systematic Neglect: Choose Your Priorities and Accept the Consequences

How Managers Can Impact Employee Retention

Making the Tough Calls: It’s What Leaders Do

Change the Organization’s Design To Get Different Results; But Be Careful . . . You Will Get What You Design

Situational Leadership Theory: It’s Just Common Sense

And, as we approach the middle of 2015, I’ll leave you with one more link:

Mid-Year Self-Assessment (It’s Not Just About Performance Objectives)

If you have not started a self-assessment of how your 2015 is going, I hope you will begin one now. As for me, I have certain things I am proud of this year, and certain regrets that projects are behind schedule. At this time, I am formalizing my commitment to weekly posts here.

I appreciate the interest readers have shown in this blog—each and every comment. I want the blog to address the everyday needs of corporate managers and leaders.

So my request is:

What would you like to see more of on this blog? Less of? I will try to accommodate your interests.

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Filed under Leadership, Management, Philosophy, Workplace, Writing

Happy Holidays


snowmanI’ve noticed in prior years that this blog gets very few hits during the year-end holidays. Therefore, this will be my last post until January 5, 2015.

In the meantime, for those of you who are working on performance evaluations or next year’s objectives, please see these earlier posts on performance management and setting objectives:

Tis the Season for Setting Performance Objectives

Goals Are Not For Losers, But Set Reasonable Goals

Performance Management: Critical to Success, Yet in Critical Condition

Assess Yourself As a Manager As You Assess Your Employees

Mid-Year Self Assessment: It’s Not Just About Performance Objectives

Thank you for reading this blog throughout the year, and . . .

Enjoy your year-end holidays!

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Filed under Human Resources, Management