Tag Archives: productivity

The Gartner Hype Cycle


I recently learned of a concept called the Gartner Hype Cycle. I probably never ran into it before because it started as a technology concept, related to the impact of new technologies on an organization. The Hype Cycle is intended to explain the maturity, adoption and social application of new technology.

But it seems to be to be broadly applicable beyond technological issues. To me, it explains why a lot of new management programs and other ideas crash and burn. Or at least, why they do not result in as much success as originally envisioned.

559px-gartner_hype_cycle

There are five stages to the Hype Cycle. It starts with a “trigger” — a new idea or technology comes on the scene and moves the organization out of stasis. Immediately, the technology is perceived as the greatest thing since sliced bread, the solution to all woes. This is the “inflated expectations” stage.

Expectations rise to a peak, and then the “trough of disillusionment” sets in. The organization realizes that the new technology does not solve all problems, and, in fact, creates issues of its own. Reactions to the technology plummet to depths lower than the stasis before the technology came on the scene.

Finally, the organization is able to sift through the benefits and detriments of the new technology as it moves up the “slope of enlightenment.” Only then does the organization reach a “plateau of productivity,” a new stasis, which is hopefully higher than the original stasis. Thus, there is benefit to the new idea, but not as much as originally anticipated.

How many times have we been through this cycle in our own organizations?

It might not be a new technology or product or service. In my own case, I think of countless business redesigns. Each one was intended to increase productivity. Each one would be the most effective way to bring creative new products to market. Each one would minimize inefficiencies and increase profitability.

And each time, the results of the corporate redesign were less than staggering.

I won’t say the redesigns were failures, but they were not panaceas. They did not magically transform the organization into a model of productivity.

And yet every few years, we tried it again. With the same results.

What examples of the hype cycle have you experienced?

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Managing Myself: Productivity v. Learning


Design Mascot Computer SalesI’ve always been an advocate of measuring productivity. When I worked in the corporate world, I ordered my days to meet the objectives my boss set for me. I influenced the setting of my objectives, but once we had agreement, I worked toward achieving them.

Now that I am self-employed, I still keep track of my activities each week and set goals for the year and for the week ahead. I break large projects up into phases and manageable pieces. I try to balance work on immediate tasks and the next steps in long-term projects.

I chafe when other people interfere with my plans to work productively. It’s easy to let family and friends and co-workers order my days for me. Their goals are not my goals, and when our goals conflict (as they inevitably will), one or both of us must compromise. If I don’t keep a laser eye on my own plans, if I don’t build in flexibility to address the necessary give-and-take of life, then I will not accomplish what I want. So I try to be flexible, yet focused.

Given my desire for productivity, I was intrigued to see an article in Inc.com a couple weeks ago by Michael Simmons of Empact titled “Average People Are Productive, Successful People Are Learners.” Because, of course, I consider myself successful, not average.

According to the article, learning is the ultimate productivity.

“The paradigm we should all consider for productivity is learning. As opposed to productivity hacks—as I said, there’s only so much in your day you can optimize—learning is an exponential process with no cap. What do I mean by this? The results of learning are twofold: better decisions and breakthrough ideas. This can give results that are 1,000x better, not just 2x better.”

What does it take to be a learner? Mr. Simmons’s article stresses the importance of reading. He suggests spending seven hours a week (one hour a day) reading—which translates, he says, to about a book every week.

That’s a good goal. I can measure that. I can build it into my personal objectives.

I do read. Mostly, I read for enjoyment, but I also read a lot of professional books and periodicals and online newsletters on human resources, dispute resolution, legal topics, business strategy, and the craft of writing. I probably spend close to an hour a day on these professional development activities every day, though I haven’t measured it daily.

Based on Mr. Simmons’s recommendation, I will try to be more mindful of how I read to learn. I will think about what I want to learn and focus more of my reading on these topics.

And I will seek out and measure other opportunities to learn—people with whom I can discuss topics I want to know more about, places I can go to see and hear and touch new experiences. In short, I will invest in myself and plan that investment into my productivity goals.

What do you do to be a learner?

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Filed under Leadership, Management, Philosophy

A Strategic Role for Human Resources in 2015 and Beyond


conference clipartBack in August 2012, I wrote that Human Resources can only claim to be a strategic partner if it brings a specialized expertise to the table with the heads of other divisions. Three years later, that point is still true.

Moreover, today it is even more critical to emphasize that Human Resources needs to change along with the changing workplace. It seems that every year, employees need to work faster and handle more information to succeed. Human Resources must increase its pace and capability commensurately.

Here are some questions to ask your Human Resources Department:

1. How should our business measure employee productivity? Can our employees achieve the standards of productivity needed to increase our bottom line? If not, what should we do about it?

2. How are we selecting candidates for the future? Do we even know what skills we will need in five years? What are we doing to make our workplace attractive to these people?

3. What are we doing to develop and retain our current employees? Can they be successful in the future? If not, how are we preparing to replace them?

4. What are you (Human Resources) doing to minimize the risk of expensive legal claims while not placing an inordinate administrative burden on the company? In other words, how do you make the business case for the policies and practices you want to impose?

5. Where should the company focus its investment—on technology or on people? Why? (The correct answer is probably on both, so how do we balance these investments?)

These are essential questions for every leadership group to answer. The answers will not come from HR alone. But HR should drive the discussion and decision-making process. If your Vice-President of HR is not, then maybe you need another head of HR.

Leaders, what other questions for HR would you add to this list?

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April is Workplace Violence Awareness Month—How To Address Potential Violence in Your Workplace


Image from the National Safety Council

Image from the National Safety Council

According to the Alliance Against Workplace Violence, April 2015 is the third year for a national observance of Workplace Violence Awareness Month. And April 28 is Workers Memorial Day, in remembrance of workers who have died at work.

I’ve addressed workplace violence before on this blog (for example, here and here), but the return of Workplace Violence Awareness Month is a good occasion to mention it again.

Workplace violence can result from actions of strangers, customers, employees, and relatives of employees. The best defense against workplace violence is awareness of the possible sources of conflict. Any strong workplace violence avoidance program should consider all these sources of violence.

 

1.  Recognizing Employees Who Might Become Violent

Obviously, businesses have the most familiarity with their employees. According to Exigo Business Solutions, here are seven behaviors to watch for in employees that can be potential warning signs of workplace violence.

  • A history of violence
  • Negative reactions to poor performance reviews
  • Drug or alcohol dependencies, which can lead to paranoia or aggressive behavior
  • Romantic obsessions which may lead to inappropriate behavior such as harassment or stalking
  • Requiring repeated instruction, repetition of errors and other concentration problems, which can indicate a troubled employee
  • Depression, which may lead to emotional or aggressive outbursts. Signs of depression can include a slowed work pace, blank facial expressions, inappropriate guilt/shame, etc.
  • Any verbal threats or other activity that is seen as ‘out of character’ for a co-worker

Note that some of these indicators are vague or difficult to determine. The best managers are familiar with their employees and notice when an employee’s behavior changes. They have a good relationship with their staffs, and employees in their organizations seek them out when there are conflicts or problems in the workplace.

 

2.  Developing an Effective Workplace Violence Prevention Program

An effective workplace violence prevention program should include

  • An assessment of the specific risks of violence at your particular workplace and an evaluation of the controls and policies already in place
  • Measures to ensure the physical security of offices and facilities, such as installing alarm systems, protective barriers, and routes for escape if danger occurs
  • Personal protective equipment, if needed, including personal-alarm systems and mechanisms for contacting security or law enforcement
  • A plan of action for responding to acts of workplace violence
  • Services to treat traumatized employees involved in an incident of workplace violence
  • Workplace-violence awareness training for employees.

See 6 Tips for Creating an Effective Workplace-Violence Prevention Program, by Tiffany Robertson, September 3, 2014, on WeComply.com (a Thomson Reuters compliance blog).

Training should cover the warning signs of a potential violent act, how to report any concerns and what to do if violence does occur. Training should cover employee’s responsibility not only for their own safety, but also for that of their coworkers, customers, and any members of the public who enter the workplace.

Workplace violence prevention is a crucial part of any crisis management program. Involve your HR and your risk management personnel in advance.

Don’t wait for the crisis to occur.

For more information on avoiding workplace violence, see:

OSHA website page on Workplace Violence

What Are You Doing for Workplace Violence Awareness Month?, by Erin Harris, April 23, 2014, Crisis Prevention Institute

Behavior Management Strategies, Crisis Prevention Institute

Spotlight on Workplace Violence Prevention and Awareness in April, WeComply.com (a Thomson Reuters compliance blog)

 

If you have experienced a threat of workplace violence, what was the most important lesson you learned?

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Finding Your True North—A Year-End Reflection


northAs I head into the end of each calendar year, I tend to spend some extra time in reflection. I recently found a list of ten things we should do to find our own true north. The list was in an old file, and I labeled it as coming from a presentation I attended by Dr. Terry Crane. However, I could not find Dr. Crane on the Internet, so I cannot provide further credentials. If anyone has links to Dr. Crane’s information, please send them to me in the comments below.

Here’s the list (it’s a good one):

1. Get an education.

2. Be an expert . . . in something.

3. Don’t take no for an answer.

4. Cultivate mentors—male and female—and never burn a bridge.

5. Build & keep your network; don’t lose a headhunter.

6. Be able to apply technology and understand how it impacts your business.

7. Become a mentor yourself—do not leave others behind.

8. Identify your support system—family and friends—know what’s important to you, and what your tolerance and flexibility are.

9. Take risks—do what’s uncomfortable, you can always go back.

10. Develop a passion for the work you do—it’s too much a part of your life not to.

Based on this list, how are you doing in finding your true north?

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Dealing With Your Nemesis


conflict-405744_640I recently was visiting the town where I grew up and encountered someone I’d gone to school with. We were classmates all through elementary and high school, and I always considered her my nemesis.

I got better grades than she did, but not by much. And she was popular, athletic, and a cheerleader from junior high on. Our parents were friends, too, so we sometimes took summer vacations together.

When I saw her recently, I realized how much our lives had diverged since high school graduation. From the perspective of four decades later, I could be glad my life turned out the way it did. I wouldn’t have wanted to face some of the challenges she did. But I sincerely hoped that she was as happy with her life as I was with mine.

Time had made our differences far less important than they seemed in high school.

Then I got to thinking about all the nemeses I’ve had at work. Here were some:

  • The attorney who was slightly more senior than me who grabbed the best assignments and only passed on the grunt work she didn’t want.
  • The HR director who monopolized our mutual boss’s time.
  • The division VP who wouldn’t provide the feedback on incentive plans that the CEO had ordered me to get.

How should we deal with difficult people in the workplace, the ones who seem to be trying deliberately to make our lives a challenge? Here are a few ideas:

1. Talk to the individual. Maybe the person doesn’t know the impact of his or her actions on you. Or maybe there’s some problem that individual has that you didn’t know about. Even if their actions are deliberate, or they don’t care, at least you’ve put them on notice that you’re aware of their behavior.

2. Get support from your manager, mentor, or others. Find out if others have had the same experience. Again, there may be information or history on the situation that you don’t know. What have others done about the problem? Is there a way for you to complain together to obtain relief?

3. Document your issues. When you talk to your nemesis, make sure to put a note in your files. Better yet, send a follow-up email—in a polite tone, or even a friendly tone, if you can manage it—setting out the problem and any agreed changes. A thank-you for any commitments to change wouldn’t hurt.

4. Suck it up. Sometimes a problem isn’t worth confronting. Or sometimes the advice you get from others is not to do anything. You will then have to decide whether you can continue working with that person or not. Whether you decide to stay or leave, at least you haven’t burned any bridges with that individual or others.

Conflict is an unavoidable part of working with other people, so we will all face it at some time. How we choose to deal with conflict determines whether the problem gets better or worse.

Who were (are) your workplace nemeses, and how have you dealt with them?

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Have You Accomplished Fifty Percent of Your Objectives For the Year?


Daily OrganizerI know it’s only the beginning of June, and 2014 is not half over yet. But most workplaces slow down in the summer months, when colleagues are out of the office. Then it’s Labor Day, then you have only a couple of months until the holiday season starts. Nothing much gets done in December.

So, are you half-way to completing your objectives? There isn’t much productive time left in the year.

Do you even remember what your objectives are?

Pull them out, and assess your performance. Then you’ll be ready for your mid-year review. If your boss doesn’t give you a mid-year review, give yourself one.

Come December, you’ll be glad you did. You’ll probably set yourself now on a path to get more done than if you ignore your objectives until autumn.

I recently read an article on Inc.com, “This 15-Minute Activity Will Make You More Successful At Work,” by Drake Baer, for Business Insider. Mr. Baer argues that people can be more successful if they set aside fifteen minutes at the end of the day to reflect and to recap that day’s accomplishments and failures.

People who take time for reflection each day come to understand their own performance better. Then they can better adapt their performance to achieve future successes.

But according to Mr. Baer, it requires more than simple reflection to improve performance. It requires writing down what went well each day and what didn’t. The extra step of documenting your learnings helps you to retain them and act on them in the future.

I keep a daily journal, although I don’t reflect on my performance every day. But twice a month I formally recap what I have accomplished in the last two weeks and what I need to accomplish in the next half month?

And on a quarterly basis, I pull out my original objectives and assess my performance against those detailed objectives.

I have a lot more than 50% of my objectives yet to get done this year. How about you?

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Filed under Human Resources, Leadership, Management, Workplace, Writing