Succession Planning in Family Business (redux)


father daughterI haven’t written about succession planning in family-owned businesses in a while, but the topic continues to interest me. (It was a significant issue in the novel I wrote, Playing the Game.) When should a company founder select a family member as the next CEO and when should the founder look outside the family?

The first piece of advice is not to leave this issue until the founder is in poor health or ready to retire immediately. Any succession plan requires time to implement, and the more time the better.

If family members are interested in the business, then they should be groomed—without making any promises—to acquire the skills and experience necessary to run the company. This may require a rotation through several departments in the business, each lasting at least two to three years. It may even require the heir-apparent getting experience outside the company, either in the same industry or another industry, to broaden his or her skills. In other words, it can take most of a career to prepare the successor to become the next CEO.

It’s also important to keep your options open. Don’t just groom one successor. Find two or three, both family members and non-family members. Having options helps everyone know that the business is being cared for and that the person selected will be fit for the job.

Open communications are critical throughout the entire process. The founder, the potential successors, and other stakeholders (both inside and outside the family) should be able to say at any point, “This isn’t working,” or to outline problems that have developed.

Also, it is best if there are trusted non-family members involved in the assessment as well. An advisor such as an attorney or CPA or executive coach who works with the business regularly can provide input on the strengths and weaknesses of the potential successor that mom or dad may not see clearly.

For more information on issues to consider, see

“5 tips for smooth ownership transitions for family businesses,” by Arne Boudewyn, The Business Journals, Feb 28, 2017

“How Do You Fire a Family Member?” by Gabrielle Pickard-Whitehea, Small Business Trends, Apr 29, 2017

“Succession Planning in a Family Business,” The Wall Street Journal, May 9, 2017

“Is nepotism in the workplace ever appropriate?” by Stan Silverman, The Business Journals, Dec 5, 2017

For other posts I’ve written on succession planning, click here.

When have you had to deal with a difficult succession planning issue, in a family-owned business or otherwise?

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