Five-Minute Meetings—I Wish!


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Last week I read an article by Sue Shellenbarger in The Wall Street Journal entitled “Can You Keep Your Meeting to Five Minutes?”

All I could say to myself was, “I wish!” My corporate life involved days full of hour-long meetings. Almost every meeting, it seemed, was scheduled for an hour.

In a matrix organization, this means a lot of meetings, just to keep up with one’s bosses, staff, and peers. A direct supervisor. A dotted-line supervisor. Six peers in the line organization I supported, as well as six Human Resources peers. Six direct reports. (Those last three categories varied, but six is about average.) That’s 20 hour-long meetings a month.

Then there were the group staff meetings, which were usually two hours long—one for the line organization, one for the HR organization, my own group staff. That’s three more monthly meetings.

There were also periodic all-day meetings with one group or another. Each of those meetings had agenda items that were one hour long—six or seven meetings packed into a single day.

And none of the meetings were real work. Most of them were just to keep tabs on what’s going on. So add in the project team meetings, the crisis meetings (when an employee needed serious discipline or firing, or an employee complained to HR), and the meetings with outside consultants.

Sometimes decisions were made, but often the meetings were status reports. I can read a status report. I can ask questions in a phone call or email or text message.

It wasn’t that the meetings were completely wasted time. They did insure that people were on the same page. They did build relationships among people whose jobs often took them in different directions working with different parts of the organization.

But for every meeting to default to an hour? Probably too long.

I typically had five or six hours of meetings booked on my calendar before I walked in the door each morning. I instructed my administrative assistant to keep two hours free on my calendar every day. She could move the time around to fit in meetings, but I wanted the two hours to get some actual work done. Some days she couldn’t do it.

I got more done in half a day on the weekend than I did in a full day during the week. Because on Saturday and Sunday there were no meetings.

So a five-minute meeting? Even if there were three times as many meetings, I would have come out ahead. Or a default of 30 minutes for a meeting would have improved my time management ability.

I remember one presentation I was scheduled to give to the company’s executive committee. My hour-long slot got pushed back until I only had fifteen minutes. My topic was admittedly a longer-term priority than some of the day’s other agenda items, so I understood why I was the presentation that got squished.

I had a sixteen-slide deck to present. I could hear the sigh of relief when I asked the executives to turn to Slide 13. The earlier slides were data, which I wanted to be sure they saw. But what was important for the time I had left was the decision they needed to make. That discussion started on Slide 13. We reached a decision in the 15 minutes of time that remained. We didn’t have as rich a discussion as I had wanted. But we moved my project forward.

I know I’m whining in this post, about too much time in meetings, about the wrong types of topics discussed in meetings, about having my own meeting time cut. But the bottom line is true—organizations spend too much time meeting and not enough time doing.

For more on holding more productive meetings, see “How to Improve the ROI of Your Staff Meetings,” by Dianna Booher, posted November 9, 2017, on TLNT.com. As Ms. Booher points out, meetings cost time—do you know how much your meetings cost your organization?

What meetings do you attend that could be shortened, delegated, or eliminated?

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1 Comment

Filed under Management, Workplace

One response to “Five-Minute Meetings—I Wish!

  1. Doing instead of contemplating could apply to a lot of life.

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