Leadership—Expressing Gratitude to Your Followers


thank-you-515514_1280“Thanksgiving is not a day” Leonard Pitts, Jr., wrote in his November 23, 2016, column.

It certainly is not. The dictionary defines “thanksgiving” as the act of giving thanks. As we return from our family holiday, this point is worth thinking about in the context of our work organizations. Giving thanks should be an every day activity for everyone, but particularly for managers and leaders.

There is one month left in 2016, one month to achieve the remainder of your goals for the year. And how will you do that without your organization? You can’t. Your people will work better if you are appreciative. One month is still 8.33% of the year. That’s enough for your gratefulness for your followers to make a real difference.

Mary Jo Asmus of Aspire Collaborative Services, Inc., goes even further in describing the importance of giving thanks. She says “Gratitude is a verb.”

“When practiced on a daily basis, [gratitude] becomes a verb, with potentially significant impact on your leadership and your life.”

In a November 23, 2014, guest post by Neamat Tawadrous on the Empowerment Moments Blog, Ways In Which Gratitude Can Transform Your Leadership and Influence, the author says:

“Gratitude sees what is good and right with the world . . . . Leaders who see their followers through the lens of gratitude will always see the untapped potential in people and inspire them to achieve what others think is impossible.”

This author says leaders should practice gratitude because gratitude develops success, leads to opportunities, brings peace, and increases trust. For me, this last point is most important:

“When we show others that we value their hard work and contributions, their trust in our leadership and direction increases.”

As leaders, we cannot achieve success without the trust of our followers.

Tom Stevens at Think Leadership Ideas wrote in a post on November 25, 2013, entitled Gratitude Leadership, that

“It’s willing followers who manifest acts of leadership. . . .

“No individual, no leader, does it alone. Great accomplishments, great organizations, and great endeavors exist due to the efforts of multiple people. Often lots of people. Savvy leaders not only feel gratitude, but communicate it effectively.”

We all know that. We just forget sometimes.

To help us remember, Mary Jo Asmus suggests choosing one person to focus on each day.

“Ask yourself, what is it about this person that makes you grateful? Be specific about what you observe.

“What do you sense in yourself as you consider the gratitude that you feel for this person?”

Do this exercise daily, and repeat it when you have run through your entire organization. You are likely to find new insights each time you think about a person. Moreover,

“As you practice this exercise, you may find yourself noticing your gratitude for others in the present moment as you go about your day. You may also notice that you see them differently, and that your relationships with them strengthen. Gratitude for others may begin to become a part of your life.”

Then, once we realize our gratitude for those around us, we must express it. As Ron Thomas wrote in Leadership 101: The Most Powerful Words You Want From Any Leader on TLNT.com on October 1, 2012,

“Thank you! These are welcome words to all of us. . . . an expression of thanks can make all the difference in a business relationship.”

He suggests being specific in your thanks, and using a handwritten note to provide a personal touch to your appreciation.

As for myself, I am thankful for everyone who reads this blog. I first posted over on Blogger in November 2011. I moved to WordPress.com in November 2012. So as November ends, I’ve been blogging for five years. I’ve made new contacts and found old ones through blogging. Along the way, I wrote a novel, which many of you have read and even reviewed. I am grateful to each one of my readers, and especially to those of you who have chosen to follow this blog.

Now, go thank the people with whom you work, particularly those who report to you.

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Filed under Leadership, Management, Playing the Game, Workplace

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